U.S. Agency for International Development

Strengthening Livestock Sector Sustainability

Cows on the Bartella Feedlot in Ninawa eat in confined feeding units.
Cows on the Bartella Feedlot in Ninawa eat in confined feeding units.
Cows on the Bartella Feedlot in Ninawa
USAID-Inma Agribusiness Program
Cows on the Bartella Feedlot in Ninawa eat in confined feeding units. The integrated approach USAID-Inma uses, which combines feed lots with forage production, is highly strategic in that it has the potential to lower the cost of production and raise the supply of red meat in the country. The alfalfa demonstration plots combined with the establishment of confined feeding units has developed the foundation for an improved and modern model of red meat production.
An Iraqi woman holds milk bottle for lamb
An Iraqi woman holds milk bottle for lamb
Sheep Breeding Project
USAID-Inma Agribusiness Program
To meet the increasing requirements for red meat and the demand for feeder lambs in the confined feeding facilities more sheep are required. USAID-Inma is working with the Zanabeq Al-Hakel Women’s Association and the Order of Saint Hormizd Monestary Orphanage in Ninawa. The program also provided 40 members of the women’s association with 200 head of sheep and the orphanage with 125 head of sheep.
Fishermen carry a net full of carp on the Euphrates Fish Farm Hatchery.
Fishermen carry a net full of carp on the Euphrates Fish Farm Hatchery.
Euphrates Fish Farm Hatchery
USAID-Inma Agribusiness Program
Fishermen carry a net full of carp on the Euphrates Fish Farm Hatchery. Central Iraq boasts 70% of the fish farms in the nation, but in 2007, only a few were still operating. The hatchery was one of the premier aquaculture farm and hatchery operations in Iraq but fell into disrepair and disuse over decades of conflict. In 2008, USAID-Inma addressed the shortage of carp fingerlings (baby fish) in Iraq and rehabilitated the pumping station of the Euphrates Fish Farm Hatchery.
Worker stands alongside conveyor belt in feed mill
Worker stands alongside conveyor belt in feed mill
Improving Feed Production
USAID-Inma Agribusiness Program
The USAID-Inma Agribusiness Program determined that an important intervention for the Livestock–Protein sector was to address the quality of feed available to Iraqi producers while establishing laboratories to analyze the feed. To address the problem, six feed mills were chosen for production improvements with three feed analysis laboratories established.
Livestock harvesting specialist demonstrates international meat cuts to Iraqi butchers
Livestock harvesting specialist demonstrates international meat cuts to Iraqi butchers
Demonstration of international meat cuts at Blann Butcher Shop
USAID-Inma Agribusiness Program
Mr. Ronnie Stratton, USAID-Inma livestock harvesting specialist demonstrates international meat cuts at Blann butcher shop, a Shavin company. USAID-Inma previously signed a grant agreement with the Shavin Company to help them construct a confined feeding facility which could accommodate 400 head of beef cattle. With USAID-Inma assistance, the butcher shop is providing beef, lamb and poultry products.
Sheep on Taji Feedlot in Baghdad at feeding time
Sheep on Taji Feedlot in Baghdad at feeding time
Sheep on Taji Feedlot in Baghdad at feeding time
USAID-Inma Agribusiness Program
Within the protein value chains, the USAID-Inma team addresses the critical inputs of feed (animal procurement, veterinary requirements, forage, protein concentrate feed), management, and laboratory services such as veterinary labs for animal health and feed analysis labs.
An Iraqi farmer tends to his sheep
An Iraqi farmer tends to his sheep
Shoumaly Sheep Feedlot
USAID-Inma Agribusiness Program
A farmer tends to the sheep on the Shoumaly Sheep Feedlot, one of the USAID-Inma projects in Hilla, where U.S. Department of Agriculture representatives conducted demonstrations of modern breeding equipment.
Iraqi women participate in training seminar on small ruminants production management
Iraqi women participate in training seminar on small ruminants production management
Classes for training in Small Ruminants Production Management
USAID-Inma Agribusiness Program
Classes for training in Small Ruminants Production Management were held in Kirkuk and Najaf in March 2010. The training focused on selecting animals for breeding, lowest and highest-value nutrition sources, fattening of small animals, the use of alfalfa hay as a main feed source, animal care and accommodation, dry feed and water needs, healthcare, feeding and diseases. The two classes were attended by 50 participants total, 25 of whom were female producers.